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War of 1812 Legacy Project

1812 Bicentennial logoUnveiling Information: Sunday, February 17, 2013.

The City of Windsor and The WindsorEssex Community Foundation invite you to celebrate Heritage Day 2013 with the unveiling of the 1812 Legacy Project, recognizing the 200th anniversary of the War of 1812.

At 2:00 PM at The Duff-Baby Interpretation Centre (221 Mill St.), learn about local artists Justin Langlois, Lorraine Steele and Phil McLeod as we unveil their exciting works. Free admission to experience their work and share food and hot beverages as we celebrate our heritage together.

The art projects, funded by the Government of Canada Department of Canadian Heritage, are part of the 1812 commemoration activities that included "The Capture of Detroit" family fun festival held August 25, 2012.

Artists from across Canada submitted proposals to have the opportunity to work on this exciting, unique project for the City of Windsor. When the selection process was complete, three local artists, representing two separate projects were selected.

all we are is all we wereOne mural named all we are is all we were is the creative design of Justin A. Langlois, an Assistant Professor and Civic Engagement Coordinator at the University Windsor. 

The piece will be constructed using LED neon flex lighting with simple, yet poetic text in a basic hand-written script. The mural aims to capture the resilient and creative spirit of two communities through a recognition and reflection of our past, present and future. 

Justin Langois is also the Founder and Director of Windsor’s Broken City Lab, an artist-led interdisciplinary creative research collective and non-profit organization working to explore and unfold curiosities around locality, infrastructure, and creative practice leading towards civic change.

War of 1812 Peace Wampum BeltWar of 1812 Peace Wampum Belt, is best described as industrial, ecological weaving of 2,988 plastic water bottles, filled with expandable construction foam for strength refashioned as wampum beads, and used to create a large free standing sculptural replica of the Peace Wampum of 1812; a 200 year old symbol of peace and friendship between First Nations and the British crown. 

 
The War of 1812 Peace Wampum Belt is the creation of Lorraine Steele and Phil McLeod. Lorraine Steele is a visual artist whose work includes collaboration with interior designers to produce large scale mural work for private and commercial spaces, private commissioned landscape and portrait work, and set design and painting for several local community theatre groups. Phil McLeod has been a Designer with Partners Design for 25 years, with over 35 years experience in creative marketing, illustration and design.
 

Mural Project made possible by:

Canadian Heritage
Government of Canada
The City of Windsor
The WindsorEssex Community Foundation
The War of 1812 Bicentennial Project